Super Reality

Augmented Reality (AR) and Virtual Reality (VR) Industry News and Technology Updates

USENS and #GDC17

As five days in sunny San Francisco came to a close, it was clear that virtual reality was all the buzz throughout the duration of Game Developers Conference, especially with the first two days of the conference being completely dedicated to VR. VRDC brought VR tutorials, VR boot camps and industry relevant speakers into an immersive AR/VR experience at the Moscone Center. This was VRDC’s second year and featured two different tracks for attendees to participate in: VR and AR for game development and VR and AR for other forms of entertainment–from CG movies to filmed experiences and beyond. It’s clear that VRDC’s presence for the second year at arguably the largest gaming conference in the world, means that virtual, augmented and mixed reality is the future and the most important steps in developing games for users and progressing the industry forward. The following three days opened the exhibition floor to companies and organizations to display their relevance to the gaming industry and how their technologies and products can progress technological advances to the next level. Oculus brought a full array of systems and demos to GDC sending an army of employees donning distinctive indigo shirts to recruit attendees to use their system with Oculus Touch controllers. PlayStation and its deep lineup of games allowed GDC-goers to sample everything from Grand Turismo Sport in a sit-in pod with a PS4 Pro to bringing back the infamous Crash Bandicoot of the early PlayStation days, and showcasing its wide variety of PSVR games as well. However, while controllers in VR and gaming in general still play a prevalent part in those fields, hand tracking sparked the interest of industry professionals and the thousands at GDC. USENS INC was a trending topic of conversation over the three days on the exhibition floor of the South Hall at the Moscone Center. We demonstrated our hand tracking capabilities with demos to show to the attendees of GDC. With several FINGO demos set-up, thousands of people in attendance flocked to the uSens booth (which happened to be close to the primary restrooms of the hall for maximum foot traffic – very strategic 😉). Throughout GDC, USENS interacted in-person and over all social media channels with tech, AR/VR and gaming influencers, journalists and industry professionals — all raving about USENS and FINGO. Here are just a couple examples: @DennisScimeca: Seriously: If you’ve never tried hand tracking in VR and have time, stop by the @usensinc booth. Tech works exactly as advertised. #gdc17. @Alexis_Macklin: Enjoyed testing out @usensinc at #gdc17. From verified Twitter users who promoted uSens to their thousands of followers to the individuals on social media who post with just a passion about their interests, USENS and our FINGO were trending topics coming out of GDC. USENS INC was featured in an article by Gao Yun of CGTN featuring FINGO and our tracking capabilities: San Jose, California-based uSens – founded by two Chinese developers – created a technology that utilizes a camera to recognize all the individual bones inside the hand, and then relays that information to the application. “Right now, people cannot interact directly in VR, but holding a controller is unnatural,” said Fei Yue, co-founder and CTO of uSens, adding that they are now letting people do whatever they want to do in real world.  As VR moves further into mainstream society, technologists agree that the experience needs to become more natural, and ironically, more like everything in the real world.  

uSens Inc. Featured in USA Today

uSens Inc. was featured in USA Today on Wednesday, after a successful showing at CES Unveiled in Las Vegas. In “CES 2017: The coolest tech you have to see”, USA Today wrote that: An attendee demonstrated Fingo, a device added to virtual reality goggles to incorporate hand gestures.  Check out the article and visit uSens Inc. at CES 2017 this week!

Augmented World Expo (AWE 2016)

The Augmented World Expo (AWE 2016) is the 7th annual trade show event that took place in the Santa Clara Convention Center on June 1st and 2nd. The expo focused on augmented reality (AR), virtual reality (VR), and wearable technology. The event itself was very similar to the Silicon Valley Virtual Reality Expo (SVVR) but it was more focused on AR. The main purpose of AWE is to help developers, start-ups, and mobile/hardware companies cultivate new technology into a productive, sustainable, and entertaining medium. The expo was also very interactive, encouraging plenty of attendees to try out demos from exhibitors. This year’s AWE show was the biggest one yet, featuring over 4000 attendees from 47 countries, 200 speakers, and 200 exhibitors. We here at uSens Inc. were part of the exhibitor list along with a balanced mix of big, medium, and small sized companies and startups such as Leap Motion, DAQRI, Intel, and Epson. The audience was also comparable to SVVR 2016. It included developers, content creators, designers, entrepreneurs, and investors, with involvement in AR, VR, and wearable technology. Our booth was extremely popular with the audience and we enjoyed their consistent enthusiasm for our AR/VR hand-tracking technology.   On June 1st, our CTO, Dr. Yue Fei, was one of the speakers at AWE 2016 and he presented a case study on Inside-Out tracking and he demonstrated our Fingo technology, which tracks the hand skeleton using infrared stereo cameras on a mobile head mounted display. The next day our development team provided a developer tutorial and demonstration for ARVR Inside-out tracking. The session included recommended best hand tracking use cases and examples for uSens hardware and software development kit. Our developers also demonstrated how to integrate our hand tracking technology with Unity 3D, Java, or C++.  At the end of AWE, attendees of our developer conference were able to receive our Beta Dev Kits, which included hardware and software needed to develop with uSens hand tracking. AWE 2016 featured the Auggie Awards which showcases the best AR technology. The 11 categories ranged from: best app, best hardware, and best game. We were nominated for Best Tool but Vuforia by PTC ended up winning the award. One of my favorite new products that I demoed at AWE was the winner of “best headset or smart glasses”, which was the Epson Moverio BT-300. These smart glasses, reminiscent of Google Glass, features an OLED HD display, a 5-megapixel camera, and a clever design that can fit over regular glasses. The BT-300 is scheduled to ship in October this year. The complete list of the other winners at AWE 2016 can be found here. The excitement at AWE was amazing this year and it was also one of the busiest tech expos that we have been a part of. I did not expect this much popularity from an augmented reality focused event because of the massive trend of virtual reality right now. Judging by this event, AR has a great chance of hitting the mainstream faster than VR. Below is a montage video that I filmed at AWE 2016. Enjoy! -Amanze Ugoh

Facebook F8 / Facebook’s Fate

Facebook F8 is an annual conference keynote that took place on April 12 and 13 at Fort Mason in San Francisco, CA. The event was directed at developers and entrepreneurs who build products and services for the social network. During the conference, Zuckerberg mentioned that virtual reality could be the best form of social networking because of its strong communal immersion. He illustrated this idea by showing off the Toybox Demo for Oculus Touch. Facebook also presented an open source camera rig that they are calling the “Surround 360 Camera”. The camera, made with 17 combined cameras, will be able to shoot 3D-360 8K video at a smooth 60 frames per second. According to Chris Cox, Facebook’s vice president of product, the company plans to share the hardware design and stitching algorithm on Github this summer. The Oculus team also demoed their VR selfie stick that aims to make VR social. With the virtual stick, users will be able to take photos of their avatars in front of famous landmarks. Once the photo is taken, the user can share it with their Facebook friends’ virtual mailbox so they could post it on the site. After talking about VR, Zuckerberg, shifted the topic to augmented reality. Surprisingly, it was the first time that Zuckerberg revealed Facebook’s interest in AR. The Facebook CEO said that we could use AR apps to replace physical objects such as an AR TV set. Facebook also showed that they wanted to combine both AR and VR into their devices, which is also what we are working on here at uSens Inc. Near the end of the conference, Zuckerberg presented a photo of a pair of black glasses. These glasses were only a glimpse into the future of Facebook tech with Zuckerberg saying that VR/AR headsets will look like a regular pair of eyeglasses in 10 years. VR and AR were also featured at the end of Facebook’s 10-year road map, along with artificial intelligence and connectivity. Now that Facebook is officially on the AR train with Google and Microsoft, it should be interesting to see how this competition will help bring AR to new heights. -Amanze Ugoh        

Vision Summit 2016 for Augmented and Virtual Reality Hit a Home Run!

The 2016 Vision Summit conference took place on February 10 and 11, 2016 in Los Angeles. It was hosted by the wildly popular middle-ware engine, Unity 3D. Above, John Riccitiello, Unity’s CEO, welcomes the elated standing room only crowd of global attendees to VS16. This special two-day VIP developer focused event may have ushered in the official sea change for 3D development moving towards 4D and beyond. This conference gathered together 1,400+ hardcore Unity 3D, digital, and interactive content and business developers focused on the business of AR and VR. The energy was unfiltered AR/VR passion for 48 hours straight. The keynote presentation consolidated impressive influencers in the contemporary AR and VR landscapes. Executives from Google, Sony, Oculus, Valve/Steam, NASA, Hollywood, as well as Unity’s CTO and VR Skunkworks team showed off their current AR and VR efforts. Attendees learned curious and interesting facts in the keynote from people like Alex McDowell explaining how the Minority Report movie storyline and world came from AR technology visionaries rather than traditional script writers. Director Jeff Norris, who leads much of NASA’s virtual outreach program from JPL in Pasadena, took the Vision Summit keynote crowd to a virtual Mars, where we viewed a glimpse of our real world with ever changing virtual content. Jeff’s team and all of NASAs virtual content developers are actively using VR and AR tools for almost every part of their outreach these days. And, of course Unity 3D is there in the hands of these developers, allowing for rapid designs and output of 3D interactive VR and AR content to take us all into space. More excellent keynote content was provided by Unity’s CTO, Joachim, and other lead engineers who demoed the new Unity 3D v5.4 capabilities that optimize and streamline rendering as well as enable in-engine VR editing, such as below. Additional keynote highlights came separately from Gabe Newell (Valve), followed by Palmer Lucky (Oculus), each with their own gifts for the crowd. Gabe had his self-anointed “Oprah” moment where he gifted every attendee a gratis commercial HTC Vive unit. Oculus followed at the end with a generous gift of months of free subscriptions for Unity Pro tools for all attendees. Needless to say, the Vive chatter never stopped until a few days ago when we all got our shipment notifications. The keynote set a high benchmark for the entire two days full of panels, presentations, networking, and parties. It was unarguably the epicenter for AR and VR development and education for those awesome days. The hosts and planning team ensured there were thoughtful and well planned tracks focusing on specific AR/VR production tools and work flow, business and investment advice from related domain experts, and most importantly was the ability to share with each other in a very well-orchestrated professional social environment. The Expo hall and demo showcase halls deserve special attention too. These areas included many of the major players, like Google with Tango, Epson with their AR glasses, to indies showing off beautiful VR worlds rendered directly from Houdini and other high-end art and audio tools. Also included were independent developers who came from Denmark, Israel, and further out to impress us with their content and technology demos. Below are some examples from the expo and demo areas. VR Unicorns have built a really fun and compelling immersive tennis experience for the HTC Vive system. Shape Space VR had a mesmerizing visual mobile VR experience. Altspace VR is now providing multiplayer social media VR experiences. Vizuality Studios combines physical peripherals with immersive VR experiences that feel “real”. The entire Unity team, the VS advisory board, all participating companies and all of the developers who attended should be commended for the incredible energy that flowed for two days non-stop. The location was convenient, there were tons of drink stations, great food, and a really respectful atmosphere to interact in. Can’t wait until next year! -Mark T. Morrison

Was 2015 the summer of VR love?

2015 is a memorable year for Virtual Reality (VR). It’s the year we may look back and remember the beginning of a new technology renaissance. The first PCs and smart phones each provided evolved human computing interaction. This new VR movement feels more collaborative within its competitive landscape. It also feels like this VR movement is going to be the best storytelling media individual consumers have had yet. Game consoles were a lot of fun for kids and playful adults who wanted to be interactively entertained, but VR represents a more natural experience for almost every use case and human being. ‘Immersive’ really is a good description for VR nowadays. The interactive development landscape has changed drastically towards more ubiquity and compatibility. From 2010-2013, middle-ware and content creators both helped to reinvent the app and game space. Developers are at the forefront of the VR movement now, creating different content flavors from immersive 2.5D games to emotionally engaging cinematic stories. Commercial VR wasn’t possible 20 or even 5 years ago, mainly because computing and graphics had not yet evolved enough in consumer’s hands. Software and hardware makers were competing with each other, rather than working together to realize self-sustaining content platforms that could benefit consumers, which equals bigger business. We’ve come a long way since mobile carriers and console manufacturers dictated our daily dose of interactive content. Now, those choices are more in the hands of consumers and the developers especially. Consumer tastes, development tools, and technology innovations have all played active roles in growing a world ready for mass market VR. One thing that appears to be set now is the race to the top of the VR ecosystem. Three big players are ready for 2016 releases and offer different value propositions to consumers in a higher priced setting. AT THE TOP PSVR (aka Morpheus): PSVR has a great launch advantage. It’s plug and play into an existing PS4 system that its users already own or might purchase for their VR experiences. Sony has really improved its 3rd party developer network over the last few years. Sony has also positioned the opportunity for its large install base of indie Unity and Unreal developers to design and publish their games directly to PSVR. The PlayStation Network (PSN) makes it easier for developers to reach consumers with their content, receiving professional support and PR from a global software and hardware manufacturer. Oculus: Oculus is synonymous with VR. It was the first (modern) VR product most of us read about in the news a few years ago. It was also invented out of a humble R&D educational setting with a broad input from many inventors, students, and researchers. While some of the original participants may not have all ended up as Oculus employees, many have continued to innovate and invent in the same VR space. Having a parent company in Facebook won’t hurt the Oculus movement as they can reach a wide target of end users, many of whom will still need to prepare their experience with expensive equipment they might not own for current Candy Crush game play. Vive: Vive is a compelling entry at the top. Many professional VR tastemakers have expressed that the Vive is the best VR experience they’ve had. This product comes from one of the top game developers in the world plus a reputable hardware partner. It’s going to be fueled by the successful Steam store, although there currently are far less Vive compatible games than those offered on Steam. In The Middle GearVR: There’s also a middle spectrum of the VR medium being created and supported by the Samsung GearVR Head Mounted Display (HMD). It’s safe to assume that other competitors will help grow out this mid-spectrum layer supporting higher-end mobile devices and experiences. StarVR: It may be premature to place StarVR into this category until they expose their tech more. It would be great to have another serious player in this middle playing field.  ??? It would be very smart for Amazon to leverage a Kindle compatible HMD in this middle VR niche. Amazon has a lot of related computer vision and AI experience as well as 126 reasons to extend the VR medium to their Kindle and App store customers. AT THE SURFACE While the mid-tier experiences might not be as high resolution as the top-tier systems, being able to experience VR on the go could ignite a lot of initial excitement and loyalty to a global smart phone install base that is quickly reaching 2B users. Google and The New York times will release 1M free ‘Cardboard’ HMDs in this Sunday’s NYT edition, all of which can be used with the new NYT VR mobile app. If this is a successful campaign, we might start to see large brands and entertainment firms using mobile VR for marketing and promotions similarly to billboards and TV commercials. There are so many perspectives and angles to look at in the future of VR business, but perhaps the easiest and potentially most lucrative near term VR opportunities are already in our pocket? Most people don’t yet realize they can experience a ton of VR content from their smart phone today, both on Android and iOS platforms. – Mark T. Morrison For more about uSens, Inc. and Impression Pi, check out our other social media sites: Twitter: @usensinc Facebook: uSens, Inc. – Impression Pi Google+: uSens, Inc. – Impression Pi LinkedIn: uSens, Inc. Company Profile

Is the Steam Machine confusing gamers?

Near the end of 2012, Valve announced that it would be developing its own video game console. This new console was excitedly & unofficially termed the “Steam Box” from industry journalists. The official name for the Steam Box was announced to be the Steam Machine in late September 2013 by Valve. With an initial release date of November 2015 (and now delayed until 2016), Valve’s Steam Machine is stirring up interest within the gaming population. It promises to fuse the compactness and design of a console with the CPU/GPU capabilities of a powerful PC. What it can do: The Steam Machine will run SteamOS, a Linux-based operating system. Users will be able to install SteamOS on any other PC computer that has the minimum SteamOS specifications. When users purchase a Steam Machine, they may also want to get a Steam Controller. The Steam Controller combines dual trackpads with an analog stick. There are many more features for the controller, but the main take-away is that it is highly customizable and unique. Finally, the HTC Vive virtual reality system (SteamVR) will support SteamOS in early 2016. The Steam Machine intends to sell hardware that: can run SteamOS is console sized and can be stored next to and played on TV has PC functionality, running Windows if users uninstall steamOS or dual boot Valve’s Steam Machine is searching to appeal to users interested in bringing SteamOS into their living room. SteamOS will allow consumers to launch Steam, search through the Steam store, download compatible games and content, and enjoy the SteamOS experiences in their living room. Potential Obstacles: There are already living room gaming PCs as well as gaming consoles in use for broader family appeal. These are in our living rooms and can function as a multi-use entertainment center that connect into TVs. Windows usually operates on the non-console desktop computers. Some possible competitive Steam Machines can be found here and here. Valve is promoting the Steam Machine by advertising SteamOS’ growing popularity. Is this enough? They claim their Linux based operating system will overtake Windows at some point, as more developers make games designed for SteamOS. Is this true? This is one take on Valve’s sales pitch for the Steam Machine: Games should be made for Linux, or in Valve’s case, SteamOS Microsoft isn’t as good Steam doesn’t have as many compatible games as Windows yet, but will someday the Steam Machine is going to be awesome Confusion? With every new console comes fan boys and naysayers. As the Steam Machine gets closer to release, more and more gamers are forming opinions. Confusion has grown from what the Steam Machine can and cannot do on launch, with more questions long term. This seems to be the existing sentiment amongst the gaming community when discussing the Steam Machine online. Message boards that have direct individual reactions to the upcoming release of the steam machine, show some bewilderment from the gaming community. Possible confusion from gamers may come from attempting to compare the pros (+) and cons (-) of the Steam Machine. Here are some potential Pros for the Steam Machine: Valve develops incredible games Steam market place is popular and successful SteamOS is open source, allowing developers to build and customize their source code SteamOS is free SteamOS works with Xbox One, Xbox 360, PS3, and PS4 controllers The Steam Controller is innovative Here are some potential Cons for the Steam Machine: SteamOS is compatible with only a fraction of the games available on the Steam store currently There may be very few games designed exclusively for SteamOS The hardware is fairly expensive, ranging from $500-$4,000 USD Valve is also selling the Steam Link, which pairs users’ gaming desktop computers with their living room televisions. Users will be able to stream games they play from their desktop computer to their T.V., in their living rooms. The biggest selling point for the Steam Machine is its SteamOS operating system paired with the Steam Controller. The customizable controller does look awesome. The Steam Machine is a great idea, and it may need to be expanded on before the majority of gamers get behind it.   For more about uSens, Inc. and Impression Pi, check out our other social media sites: On Twitter: @usensinc On Facebook: uSens, Inc. – Impression Pi On Google+: uSens, Inc. – Impression Pi On LinkedIn: uSens, Inc. Company Profile

The Impression Pi AR+VR headset may change the way we interact in our daily routines

The next generation of technology is upon us, and uSens, Inc is leading the advance with it’s Virtual Reality/Augmented Reality Impression Pi headset.  uSens, Inc is a small Silicon Valley startup, but the company is taking the virtual and augmented reality industry to the next level. To give a brief background; virtual reality (VR) is a term for a “computer-generated simulation of a three-dimensional image or environment that can be interacted with in a seemingly real or physical way by a person using special electronic equipment, such as a helmet with a screen inside or gloves fitted with sensors.” Augmented reality (AR) is a term used for “a technology that superimposes a computer-generated image on a user’s view of the real world, thus providing a composite view.” The terms have evolved throughout the years as the technology has advanced. So why would anyone want Impression Pi?  The answer is complex for the developers, but very simple for us.  Impression Pi is not only able to display a virtual reality world, but also an augmented reality world.  The device also allows the user to physically interact with the displayed world, with 3D hand-gesture control and position tracking. It is the first device able to do this, out of a myriad of others. This effectively opens up a technological universe for any company or organization.  Companies that develop social media, video games, and video streaming technologies can release entertainment applications for Impression Pi.  Applications can also be made for healthcare, education, and business training.  As mentioned earlier, the opportunities are endless. Impression Pi is compatible with most newly released smartphones, which serve as the main screen for the device.  The device opens up and allows you to insert the phone into the opening.  After connecting your smartphone to the USB/Lightning port, you can select the specific application you want Impression Pi to interact with.  It is brilliantly simple, and incredibly user-friendly. Impression Pi achieves the VR/AR affect by mounting two cameras at the front of the device and inserting an array of infrared sensors around the headset.  The cameras are able to allow you to see what is happening in front of you.  The infrared sensors around the device track the physical movement of the headset and your hand movements.  You can interact with the virtual universe displayed in a 3-Dimensional format with your hands and body movement.  It is also wireless – you can move anywhere without being restricted. To this date, Impression Pi has gathered over $300,000 in pledges from its Kickstarter campaign.  The company’s initial goal was to raise $75,000. The outstanding reality is that uSens, Inc started creating motion capture technology in 2013.  They started developing the VR/AR Impression Pi near the end of 2014 and have already managed to create an innovative product in less than a year. So what companies are actually interested in developing applications for it?  Well, everyone; but they need to discover it.  Let’s think about the video game industry.  Video game companies are looking for a big break in the visual technology realm.  Graphic engines are already photo-realistic, but we are still limited to staring at a computer or phone screen in order to view them.  Imagine integrating those incredible graphics into a 3-Dimensional world and the real world. Impression Pi is almost here, and its technological advancements are going to revolutionize the VR/AR industry.  Lucky for all of us, this is just the beginning. “Virtual Reality” Def.1. OxfordDictionaries.com. Oxford Dictionaries, n.d. 1 Oct 2015 “Augmented Reality” Def. 2. OxfordDictionaries.com. Oxford Dictionaries, n.d. 1 Oct 2015 For more about uSens, Inc. and Impression Pi, please visit our other web sites: Twitter: @usensinc Facebook: uSens, Inc. – Impression Pi Google+: uSens, Inc. – Impression Pi LinkedIn: uSens, Inc. Company Profile

uSens adds a Corporate Business Development Director to its team

We just beefed up our Business and Marketing talent with the addition of Mark Tascher Morrison. Mark has over 27 years of experience in the media, entertainment & technology industries.   Mark was born in the Northwest and grew up in Salt Lake City and Seattle. As a baby, Mark lived in Hong Kong and Taiwan, much to the excitement of our team. In 1989, Mark graduated from Pitzer College in Claremont California with a degree in Fine Arts. While at Pitzer, Mark’s creative growth in college inspired him to go into the music business in Los Angeles and Jamaica.  From the music industry, he transferred his skills to TV, film, and video games.  Mark’s background includes production, marketing, and business development, which run alongside his massive interest as a digital pop culture consumer. Mark’s most recent business accomplishments have been with Unity Technologies and Daqri. While at Unity, Mark was the Director of Business Development and Sales for 3 years; managing all of the enterprise level platform customers, publishers, and game developers. He was a key player in building and growing what is now one of the biggest game engine businesses in the world. Mark has spent the last two years focusing on Augmented Reality (AR) and Virtual Reality (VR) technology with Daqri, starting in 2014.  His mission was growing their AR enterprise business products and services. “AR&VR mediums will drive our daily activities in the future,” Mark states simply.  He adds, “The opportunities are wide open for developers and consumers to transform their physical environments into more meaningful experiences. Once AR&VR technology reaches critical mass, we’ll be able to interact with content that we’ve only been able to imagine in the past. This imagination will soon become transformed into physical and emotional experiences in our digital world.” Mark’s professional passion shifted when the technology industry moved from the static limitations of computers to the contemporary mobile platforms we now operate in. Mark elaborates, “We went from a linear media industry to something dynamic and interactive with the introduction of incredible mobile technology.” He stays ahead of consumer trends by focusing on his personal technology use with influences from his family. This has helped grow his current zeal for AR&VR. The world is Mark’s oyster, and now he is applying his advanced understanding of business development, sales, and marketing to our company. Mark’s long-term goal is to support our team’s vision to expand our road map into successful productization. He is excited about working with the rock star minds that will bring our innovative technologies to the market. Mark is going to evolve with our talents into something huge. Thanks Mark, we are as psyched as you.   For more about uSens, Inc. and Impression Pi, check out our social media sites: On Twitter: @usensinc On Facebook: uSens, Inc. – Impression Pi On Google+: uSens, Inc. – Impression Pi On LinkedIn: uSens, Inc. Company Profile  

uSens’ Impression Pi Generates Huge Buzz and Interest at SIGGRAPH

Last week, we brought our Impression Pi prototype, complete with our latest advances in augmented reality overlay, seamless transitions between augmented and virtual reality, and 3D “free hand” gesture recognition and tracking, to SIGGRAPH. SIGGRAPH is an annual conference on computer graphics convened by the ACM SIGGRAPH organization. This year, the conference was held at the Los Angeles Convention Center from August 9-13. This year at SIGGRAPH, we offered attendees the chance to experience two different demos. The first, was a demonstration of Impression Pi’s hand tracking / gesture recognition technology. This demo invited attendees to poke at balloons in space using their fingers. The cameras on the Impression Pi Core track the user’s hand movement and depth and translate that into virtual reality, so you can see yourself interacting with the balloons. The second demo stole the show. In this one, which we have dubbed, “The Terracotta Warrior Experience,” attendees had a chance to interact with a model Terracotta Warrior. Our Impression Pi first impressed users with an AR overlay, etching its original colors back onto the Terracotta Warrior. Then, users were amazed as the augmented reality scene shifted right before their eyes to virtual reality. In VR, users were able to interact with the scene, accessorizing the Terracotta Warrior, before the scene shifted back to AR. Our team not only had a booth space on the exhibition floor at SIGGRAPH, we were also invited to present at VR Village. At VR Village, we presented for two days. On the second day, due to the huge volume of attendees interested in Impression Pi and the long lines that had formed on the first day, the organizers placed us in one of the largest demo spaces at VR Village. On the exhibition floor, the level of buzz that Impression Pi generated was significant as well. Often, there were 10-15 people at any given time, waiting to try out Impression Pi. Over the course of the three days that we were at SIGGRAPH, over 1,000 people either visited us at our booth or came by our table / demo space at VR Village. Attendees who stopped by to try out Impression Pi represented a diverse group of people, from university researchers to graphics designers to content developers. We were especially thrilled to see several of our Kickstarter backers who came by our booth to try out our latest technological progress with Impression Pi. Impression Pi will be tabling at TechCrunch’s Disrupt SF, from September 21 – 23. Farther out, we will have a booth at CES 2016 in Las Vegas from January 6 – 9, next year. For more about uSens, Inc. and Impression Pi, check out our social media sites: On the Twitter: @usensinc On the Facebook: uSens, Inc. – Impression Pi On the Google+: uSens, Inc. – Impression Pi And their company page on LinkedIn: uSens, Inc. Company Profile